Monday, December 22, 2014

Limitation of Usage of Local High School Tracks

Hi,

I am writing regarding a disturbing occurrence that has just taken place in the San Mateo Union High School District.  This same ruling could occur at any other high school in the area, in California, or in the United States.

Peter Stein, who is a long-time local runner, brought this to my attention and requested that I send the attached to as many people as possible. If you agree with Pete's comments, it would be greatly appreciated if you could e-mail your response to the individuals listed in his letter.  If enough people show their strong objections, this ruling can possibly be challenged and overturned.  Remember, we live in a democracy, and our collective responses are important in making constructive changes in our society.

Happy holidays to everyone.

Jack Leydig
We Need Your Help

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm 69 years old. I've been running for 40 years. I stared running on a high school track. If I didn't have that track to run on I probably never would have become a runner.
It took a few months to build up the confidence to run on the streets.

Anonymous said...

Completely agree with you. The track at the local highschool where I live is locked all the time and I always have to climb over the fence to use it.

Philip Deacon said...

As schools invest more in their tracks/stadiums there has been a trend to protect their investments. Both the high schools in our area now have closed tracks and the local JC is the only "open" track for the community.

If the football field or other football-related facilities weren't part of the stadiums, I wonder whether they would still be closed off.

I'mNotaRobot said...

"As schools invest more in their tracks/stadiums there has been a trend to protect their investments. Both the high schools in our area now have closed tracks and the local JC is the only "open" track for the community."

And I think therein lies the issue. "Their" tracks/stadiums and "their investment," versus "our."

No school purchases equipment, builds tracks and stadiums without funding, i.e., public funding through taxation, grants, or fundraising.

Public is public, right? Apparently not so much anymore. Most of the public high school tracks are off limits to the public in my area, except the community college and a few middle school tracks.

Anonymous said...

As a coach/teacher who hears from the public and also from the school-side of arguments like this, I can say that the public truly doesn't understand how much vandalism occurs and how much is costs to fix. At my school (in the North Bay), there was at least $40,000 done in damage over the summer to our storage facilities and athletic facilities. And that's just one summer. The public's money might fund the initial construction of the facilities, but school districts are strapped for cash these days and there isn't a lot of money set aside to fix vandalism.

Anonymous said...

You are correct about vandalism, and it is sad when one or two destroy it for the vast majority. Of course, it is public monies, also, that fix this vandalism, but resources are limited.

Nils said...

To me, it's a commentary on decreasing public tax support for public institutions in general. Thank Howard Jarvis for this.

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